Morning Breakthrough: What are BHAGs?

Oh, hey, you must be here to hear about BHAGs.

BHAGs are Big Hairy Audacious Goals and they're really meant to be something that you can define that will get people excited towards a common goal. Different than usually mission statements or quarterly goals that set, but don't get people as excited.

BHAGs are meant to get people just rally behind something to accomplish

What you really want to do with a big hairy audacious goal is make sure that it meets a couple of criteria.

 

  • Does it stimulate forward progress?
  • Is there something that you all want to achieve and everybody can rally behind?
  • Does it stimulate people to move forward and accomplish things?
  • Does it create momentum?
  • Does it get that excitement going?
  • Are people ready to accomplish it?

Something that really just builds the juices of the company to say we really want to do this.

And again, it should really just be stimulating and exciting. That's why it's called a big hairy audacious goal. But a Big Hairy Audacious Goal is really about something that feels tangible, that feels really exciting and can get the team rallied to accomplish it.

So in your organization, if you haven't created some Big Hairy Audacious Goals: do it. Create some excitement in the organization, put them out there, and get everybody rallied behind to accomplish something big and something hairy.

That's BHAGs.

Thanks for joining me for a Morning Breakthrough. See ya everybody!

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